Alkaline Rocks and Carbonatites of the World

Funded by HiTech AlkCarb - New geomodels to explore deeper for Hi-Tech critical raw materials in Alkaline rocks and Carbonatites

Armenia

Armenia

The Caucasus is an Alpine orogenic structure generated by collision between the Eurasian and Afro-Arabian plates, the area of contact being marked by the Lesser Caucasus ophiolite zone and intense volcanic activity. The Alpine alkaline volcanism in the Caucasus occurs in two distinct structural settings the first of which is palaeoceanic and characterised by volcano-sedimentary sequences which are closely associated with the ophiolites. In the second setting the alkaline rocks are associated with an intra-arc extensional regime and were emplaced immediately after the main stage of continental collision. The alkaline magmatism is essentially Eocene to Miocene in age and is principally developed in the countries of Armenia, Azerbai'an and Georgia (Fig. 2_50). The greatest contributions to our knowledge of the Caucasian alkaline rocks were made by Adamyan (1955), Aslanyan (1958), Bagdasaryan (1966), Gevorkyan (1965), Kotlyar (1939), Meliksetyan (1963a and 1963b) and Azizbekov et al. (1979).

Figure: 
Scratchpads developed and conceived by (alphabetical): Ed Baker, Katherine Bouton Alice Heaton Dimitris Koureas, Laurence Livermore, Dave Roberts, Simon Rycroft, Ben Scott, Vince Smith